Conquering Chaos

Ep 18: Collaborations, Content & Consistency with Katie Lamb

July 30, 2019 Season 1 Episode 18
Conquering Chaos
Ep 18: Collaborations, Content & Consistency with Katie Lamb
Chapters
Conquering Chaos
Ep 18: Collaborations, Content & Consistency with Katie Lamb
Jul 30, 2019 Season 1 Episode 18
Erin E Hooley
Marketing on a budget is made easy if you can master one simple thing. RELATIONSHIPS.
Show Notes Transcript

Marketing on a budget is made easy if you can master one simple thing. RELATIONSHIPS. 

Influencer marketing has been around well before anyone ever coined a fancy phrase for it. As businesses and brands have grown accustomed to this rising form of marketing, strategic collaborations have emerged and enabled entrepreneurs to think outside traditional cut throat marketing approaches. We see more and more collaborative alliances amongst brands eager to share their similar audiences and grow in unison.

Speaker 1:
0:01
[inaudible].
Speaker 2:
0:02
Welcome to the conquering chaos podcast. I'm your host, Aaron [inaudible], president and founder of multimillion dollar e-commerce children's clothing line, Bailey's blossoms. So it turns out I'm pretty good at business, but what really lights my soul on fire? It's providing other entrepreneurs and mompreneurs with the tools they need to truly succeed. So if you have a business or have one on your heart, you're in good company. Pull up a chair or dropping some ear buds and let's conquer some chaos today.
Speaker 2:
0:31
Influencer marketing has been a hot topic for a while now and it's not going away regardless of where you're at in your influencer journey. In this episode, we're talking tricks of the trade from the eyes of an influencer. Katie lamb is a professional photographer, content creator and business coach with a passion for helping others succeed in their own small businesses. Her Instagram account is gorgeous and she has developed a consistency in her branding and collaboration that I really wish everybody had and understood the value in, so it was a no brainer for me to invite her onto the show. What I love about Katie is that her heart is truly as beautiful as her talent. After receiving her bachelor in fine art photography, she traveled the world documenting various orphan outreach programs in China, Africa and Eastern Europe while also starting her own lifestyle photography brand here in the u s Katie is a wife as well as a mother to twin toddlers and is currently based in Kansas City.
Speaker 3:
1:29
Katie, welcome to the show. Well thank you. I'm so excited to be here. It's great to have you here. So I'd love to have you go into just a brief overview of who you are, what you do, and what mompreneur ship looks like for you.
Speaker 2:
1:44
So I, my name is Katie lamb and so I have been in business for 11 years now. I'm a professional photographer and also content creator and business coach. I do a lot of mentor sessions for other photographers and small business owners. And I originally got into all of this because I, my family, we adopted two little girls from China who are now my best friends in the whole world, but I was 18 at the time and it just totally rocked my world and changed my life and changed what I want to do with my life. And so I majored in fine art photography at Baylor University in order to travel around the world and document the efforts of different mission groups and also raise awareness for the orphan crisis around the world. So that's where I really started out with photography and then created my business and just fell in love with business itself. And so my little photography business has now expanded into so many different businesses.
Speaker 3:
2:37
That's great. I love it. So what are some of the key things, obviously your hands are in a lot of cookie jars right now. What are your, maybe your top three favorite things that you're doing in the entrepreneurship field?
Speaker 2:
2:48
I would say business coaching. So right now that really looks like I do a lot of one-on-one. Um, and now it has turned into actually creating courses in my shop. That's awesome. And that provide you more
Speaker 3:
3:00
of a passive income approach so you can bless your family with having to constantly trade your time for money. So my husband's in the NFL world and so he's done all that
Speaker 2:
3:09
the time. And we have pockets throughout the year, like off season and stuff where I can pour hardcore into my business and create courses to release and launch throughout the year. Um, which really helps a lot having kids at home, not having the ability to work normal hours.
Speaker 3:
3:24
That's awesome. And I have to say your home is stunning and your photography matches it, Mike. Oh my goodness. Your social media, your Instagram, all of it. It's just perfectly on point. And just for our listeners to know too, I met Katie, we were speaking at a social media. It was social media conference, right? And it was such a great time. She is at a sweet as she is. Beautiful. So I'm so happy to have you on here and kind of pour into the community. Um, I love to know how do you use your work to bless your family?
Speaker 2:
3:56
I would say obviously the obvious answer is financially I, you know, think back to my family and being able to provide. Um, but then also for me, it's being home because of creating my own businesses. I am home with my kids every day. So I have twin three year olds and I wanted to be a mom first always. And being home with them and then doing business and somehow using that in. So for me, that's a huge part of that is being able to be at home every day with my kids because they're not going to be kids for much longer.
Speaker 3:
4:31
That's so true. Do you feel like having children has influenced or changed your business model in any way? Oh, absolutely. It's changed everything because before kids, I mean, we all know as moms like you have all the time in the world. Like now we look back and realize it. But you do look back at our time before being a mom. It's like, what did I do with all my stuff? We slept, that's what we did. We sleep. So I mean just being,
Speaker 2:
4:58
working through all my businesses to be more efficient is, is huge. And then just really setting boundaries in my business I would say is a big one that didn't happen as much before kids, but now really making sure that I protect our family and our family time and everything like that to make sure that I'm always present in my,
Speaker 3:
5:17
I love that. So let's talk a little bit about that. What do those boundaries look like for you? What boundaries have you set up that have made a difference too?
Speaker 2:
5:25
The main things for that and one is I found myself and I feel like a lot of business owners, especially re my being a mom or not, and the early years where yes, people,
Speaker 3:
5:39
well everybody like us, they want everybody to be smiling every time we walk in a room. Yes, exactly.
Speaker 2:
5:46
And you want to appeal to everyone. You want everybody to be your client, things like that. Um, and really over, you know, the past 11 years, learning no is much more powerful then yes, in your own business. And so learning to say no and really defining my brand and knowing I don't want to reach everybody. I want to reach my ideal clients. And then, um, so learning to say no and saying no, even if it's like I, especially as a mom now say it's an amazing speaking opportunity. You, it's amazing opportunity that it's going to make me leave. You know, like pre kids it would be like, ah, yes I want to do that. But now it really makes me realize is this longterm goals? Is this what I want? Does this really get me to where I want or is it just kind of flashy in the moment?
Speaker 2:
6:30
Um, so things like that, just saying no. And then another thing for me, just being on social media, um, and, and putting so much out there, really creating boundaries of our personal life. I don't put much so life on, um, Instagram and on Facebook I really limit, I'm very intentional about what I'm putting on there. And I don't put my kids on there very much. So you may see them like in my professional work and things like that. But I think in this we are the new generation of letting our kids grow up in social media. And I think a lot of the times we haven't seen the effect, the lifelong effects it's going to have in our children. And I think people forget that yes, they're little right now, but these are real humans. They're going to grow any real. And so for me, like I'm just never gonna you'll never see a story like Instagram story of my kids screaming or crying or throwing a fit. I just don't think that's fair to children. Um, so for me that's it. It's really making boundaries on what I put out there and being very intentional that everything has a specific purpose and it's not just a share my life. I do have a private Instagram account where I share, you know, pictures and like things like it's not open to the public for any crazy [inaudible] site.
Speaker 3:
7:44
No. And I recently did that too. That was a change, but I never anticipated I would have. Um, but I have my professional, um, forward facing pages and then I have my personal ones that are just specifically for family and close friends. Um, things that again, like you're saying, creating those boundaries and saying, all right, well yeah, maybe, maybe Bailey's okay with me saying showing this story or telling about how she, you know, beat up her brother or whatever with family and friends, but maybe she's not okay with me putting that out to the rest of the world. So just being respectful of those boundaries. That's great. I love that. And I love that you touched on intentionality as well because that's such a huge piece. I think that often as entrepreneurs, when we have interests in so many different realms, it's really easy for us to scattershot our, our efforts in many different realms as well.
Speaker 3:
8:34
And so we're constantly throwing spaghetti at the wall to see what's gonna stick. But when we really take the time to step back, to break down our efforts to communicate with the people that actually are interested in what we're doing. Because like you said, we can't please everybody. Then we, and I heard and I wrote this down while you were talking, attract best repel the rest, like a magnet. You want w you, I mean two sides of a magnet. We cannot please everybody. And if you are trying, you will burn yourself out. And I think that that's a lesson that every entrepreneur pass the beginning phases has learned and many people are probably beating their head against the wall right now going, what is this? And it's, it's that yes. Crisis moment where you tried to be that. Yes, girl all the time. I love it. I love it. Let's talk about social media. How do you utilize it? Um, and I know that you're huge into influencer marketing and you use that to propel your business. So what does that look like for you?
Speaker 2:
9:34
So with that, I kinda got into that as a photographer. I think it's an easy transition because businesses want beautiful photography. So we have, we have just a, what does that word? We have a collaboration. Yeah. We have just a benefit that other people may not. It's just, Oh yes, transition. I think so for me it was like probably three years ago, I started realizing that and I'd have brands reach out to me because you create beautiful content and they want to use that. That's really where that started. So basically there's three different ways to work with influencer marketing, one affiliate marketing and basically what that means is you're linking products and you're getting a commission. You're not necessarily working directly with that company, you're just linking them getting commission. And then there's brands or brand collaborations and those can happen. Um, if you, you can either pitch the brand yourself or they pitched directly to you.
Speaker 2:
10:29
And then the last way is actually working with like an agency. It's an influencer network and they're the middleman basically. And they pair up people that can brands and, and influencers. So I do it all different ways. I do it, I use all their three ways and it's been very beneficial for me. And so in as far as like actually working with the brands, that's where you're making the majority of your income, I would say. And affiliate marketing, at least for me, some, some bloggers make crazy amounts of money in affiliate marketing, but affiliate marketing for me is just like bonus income or comes in. So that's how I kind of incorporate that and then also mix it in with my photography as well. I love it.
Speaker 3:
11:08
Back to the intentionality piece as well, I would imagine as if you're doing it right, most people aren't just taking any Gig, obviously for you to push batteries or something might not be consistent with your brand, with your, with all of the efforts that you do in your businesses. And so you have to be a little choosy to make sure that that collaboration works both ways and that you're not willing to do anything to make a buck.
Speaker 2:
11:33
That is so true. And I feel so strongly about that because I feel like for every one influencer, which that's a loose word now, but before when every one influencer that's doing it well, there's 500 not doing it well, and it'll please sell out I think. Because if you're taking and get it, like if you see the money, like Oh, I'll take that, I'll take that, I'll take that. And every opportunity that comes your way, but your audience reads that so quickly.
Speaker 3:
12:04
Yeah. And it becomes less genuine people, the trust factor is not there when people realize and see-through, okay, this isn't because they actually feel this way is because they just need to make a a desperate dollar.
Speaker 2:
12:15
Exactly. And it's so obvious to people. And so for me it is all about intentionality. It has to match my brand, it has to go with that. And that comes also down to I think follower number. A lot of people are like, well, just don't have a big following. I don't think I could do this. And I think your follower number, something I always say does not matter as much as you think it does. I only have 15,000 but my income could be just as much from influencer stuff as people with 500,000 because of my 15,000 are people that there are very high buying audience and they're very, they're trusting because I'm only putting out stuff that they know.
Speaker 3:
12:52
Funny enough, cause I follow you and I don't follow very many people. I try to keep that clean because then they get a lot of follow for follow requests. I'm like, no, I don't play that a game. Um, and but I follow you. And you had done a collaboration with a the kindred cut. Yes. And I loved her work. She's a, you know, she does work with her husband, they make signage. We're moving into a new warehouse right now. They're making all of our signs. So I reached out and I'm like, how Ahluwalia something not traditional. It's gorgeous. It's wood. Oh my gosh. It's beautiful. And she's just blowing my mind with her talent. So yes, there are things where I like your style. I follow you, you show me something that collaborated that makes sense within your realm of style. And I'm going, Oh of course. Of course that would work for me too because I'm already connected to what your style is. So again, it's relevant and it works because it's consistent with your personal brand.
Speaker 2:
13:51
Exactly. That's such a good point. And a good point to show that cause there's, there's pros and cons to influencer stuff and it's all out there in the news and I think this just that story loan shows, it works.
Speaker 3:
14:03
It totally works. It's a beautiful way for a big job too. I bet you did. Like we got a couple of five foot signs coming right now. Oh that's awesome. Yeah, she's a sweetheart. Okay. So I want to ask you when to monetize and when to not and how you got started in that.
Speaker 2:
14:24
I started, like I said a few years ago, and I think it came from me when I had a lot of people asking questions, the same questions about stuff. And that's when I really realized I can make something out of this. And however, I don't know if there's a line, I mean I only had 6,000 followers at the time when I started monetizing and getting big collaboration's probably because of the photography. Um, but I don't that there's like a strict line of when to and when not. I think as long as you're intentional and doing it well. But, um, like I said, I just don't, I don't believe that your follower numbers should ever scare you away or make you feel like it's, exactly, I just don't think that's the case because if you are true to your brand and build a loyal following, then it doesn't really, it doesn't really matter.
Speaker 2:
15:17
I mean, I just did a, a this affiliate campaign kind of thing and there were bloggers on there promoting it with hundreds of thousands of followers and I was like the little guy and I pushed like triple more sales than any of the big ones pushing it. Like I said strictly, I'm only saying that to say that it was because of the audience I built and being intentional and, and so when I put something out there, you know, no people no are really believe in it. So I don't necessarily think there's a time not to monetize it in a time to, I think if you're just going to do it, do it well and be intentional. Learn to say no. I say no to 99% of the collaborations that come in my inbox and say yes to like the 1% I think that that's the part and not, not to chase the money cause it'll come if you're, if you're consistent and you're intentional, but just don't chase it in the beginning cause people are quickly going to see through it and just not want to be a part of it.
Speaker 2:
16:12
Absolutely. I love it. I love it. Okay, so let's talk a little bit about authenticity in social media with all of the, what do they call it, the phone or ability out there as, yeah. How do you stay authentic to who you are? I guess for me it's just, gosh, I don't, I'm just, I don't want to seek fake this and even the fake real nut or the real fake fake realness or, you know, I just, I'm me to anyone that meets me I think. And so, and maybe that is an age thing too. I don't know if that comes from maybe, yeah. I think maybe that just comes from like at this point in life, I'm 33. I have kids, I don't have time to be faithful. I'll tell you why. It was hard. Things are hard. Motherhood is hard. Like it's hard. And so I, I like to relate with my followers that way because you're going to be like, are people just being truly real?
Speaker 2:
17:08
Um, now that being said, I'm not getting on. I, my business is built around intentionality, right? So I'm not getting on recording in the middle of emotional breakdown or something like I'm doing that cause my stories, especially on Instagram, like I want it to be a tip giver. I want to be intentional about why I'm getting on. Um, but I also want to be just real knowing that I want to follow people that are real and you just threw it when, uh, when it's not and right. And I love so, so much of what your personal brand is. I mean you have your photography, you do your DIY, you've got your blog. I mean there's, and then you also do your collaborations with other brands. So there's so many,
Speaker 3:
17:51
so many pieces that you're juggling right now. And what I see, and correct me if I'm wrong, what I see is that you are giving enough for enough value for free that your audience is loyal, they trust you so that when you do open your mouth to sell, they are ready to buy.
Speaker 2:
18:11
Exactly. My whole method is like the serve, serve, serve, serve, serve, sell methods. So like six times before I'm ever selling anything. Um, cause I never want to come across as by this, by this, by, you know, it's always serving them well, giving them the free stuff and so it creates a trust in them to whenever I am ready to sell.
Speaker 3:
18:31
I love it. And you know, it's so funny cause I know I've got a lot of boutique owners and other like retail oriented businesses that that tune in to this episode in the air into this podcast that may be going on, but that's not relevant to me and I'm going to push back a little bit and say yes it is because with Bailey's blossoms and it's a clothing line we serve in the way we treat people, we show, we serve in the way we show up in the way that we communicate in the way that we were constantly there for what, even if it costs us more than we will ever get back in any one cell. It's that is okay because that's who we are and no matter how many people are in our sphere who may be quote unquote competitors, we know that that's one thing that can never be copied because it's authentic to who we are. And so there is that serve, serve, serve, serve, serve, serve, serve, sell, works for all methods and all modes of business regardless of what industry you're in. You can attribute that service model into your company and it becomes more authentic, you become more trustworthy, your customers, your clients, your fans become more loyal and then round and round we go in. It's fantastic.
Speaker 2:
19:45
Absolutely. I totally agree. It can be applied across the board. Any, any business.
Speaker 3:
19:50
Yes. Okay, so let's talk about structuring your feed. What's more important to you, your visual layout or engaging content? Is it possible to have both?
Speaker 2:
20:01
I do believe it's possible to have both, and I know people this personal preference, I guess for me as a business owner, but for me as a photographer, as a content creator, the what? The aesthetics of my feed is extremely important, but let's just say a potential client or pops on over to my feed and they only see it for like they're going to look at it like two seconds. That's when we have fast. We're going to judge that feed. If they're looking into need to book a photography session or something like that, that that has to be good. That's their first impression because they're going there long before people may likely never even go into my website for photography purposes. So my feet, it's so important. The aesthetics is there. However they engagement, I want the engage in content as well. So for me, I see specifically in my industry with photography, and I honestly, I think so many industries across the board is they'll post a picture of their product.
Speaker 2:
20:52
So it's a photographer, they're posting just a picture of, you know, a picture that they just took it a shoot or let's just say it's a boutique owner. They're just pitch posting a picture of the shirt. Um, and that's kind of it. Or they're just saying like from tonight session or new in the shop versus, you know, something like that. I think it can go further by telling a story behind it, asking questions at, you know, things like that to really, you still have a great image, but you can use that caption to really make push engagement further. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
21:18
Call to action where people are actually engaged in their response. I love that. So what about for people who aren't photographers who don't have a very clear specific style, what, what advice would you give to them to kind of hone in on just the consistency in their feed? And is that a
Speaker 2:
21:38
important, I do think it's important. I mean, I, I think it's cause it's part of your brand and for me, my entire brand is built around intentionality and consistency. Like everything I do from the service I offer to the actual product. So for me it's extremely important, not just in my feed but on my website. Anything that's ever put out there. And so I do think the tips I would give is either if you're taking your own pictures, invest in a course, invest in something to really learn how to use your camera, how to get the look that you're wanting. Um, or if you, if you have the ability, you're a bigger company or something, and you can invest in a photographer, your, you know, on either on your staff or someone that you're contracting out for every shoot. So that it is consistent. Because if you're hiring different photographers for every project, nothing's ever going to look the same.
Speaker 2:
22:26
So either learning, investing in your own photography to be able to do your own or hiring out. And if you're doing your own learning that you can't just apply a filter. I feel a filter on a bad photo is just a filter in a bad photo. It still looks like a bad photo with a filter on it. So making sure you're learning how to take the images correctly. And then once you either purchase a preset, like a light room preset or whatever you want like that, make sure you're editing your photos the exact same way. You don't just edit specifically for that photo to make it look the best of that, but you edit for the whole group, your entire photos that you ever placed in your feed. So all of them are starting to look consistent.
Speaker 3:
23:06
I love that. And that really goes back to, you know, one of the first things that we did when we had, um, one of our first official marketing meetings, cause so many, so many things in my business were not intentional. They were very unintentional. I didn't realize I was running that way until I realized that people were always confused in what direction are we running and why are we running that way and what does end? And I realized, Oh man, nobody knows where to go until I tell them we need to make this a little bit more official. So this was a couple of years ago, but we sat down and we went through our brand. We said, okay, if this, if this brand had a, a name, a personality, a, what would, what would she sound like? What would she talk? What would she look like? And we went through all these things and everybody filled this out and said, this is what I think.
Speaker 3:
23:51
And then we put them all together and I thought, oh my gosh, we really do have a personality here. And oftentimes what happens when we're not doing that intentionally is we can then look in the mirror and go, wow, I just projected my personality onto my brand unknowingly. And so that's a really interesting thing to then pull back on and say, okay, am I okay with all of these things? What do we want to change? What can we emphasize? What can maybe is the attracting a little bit to be able to create that consistency in personality? So to your point, if I were to go on your feed and it was a smorgasborg of styles and colors and, and different effects, I would not know who Katie Lam was as a brand, as a branded personality, who are you? And that's for whether regardless of your industry, whether you're selling food or fashion or photography, it really doesn't matter. Your brand needs to be consistent in what you have set up from the beginning. And so there needs to be that flow. So you need to take a moment to step back and identify the personality behind what you've created because that will provide guardrails when you make those decisions.
Speaker 2:
25:01
Absolutely. Yeah. You worded that just so well? Yes to that really just while you were speaking about that made me realize too, like for my specific brand, I have multiple different sections of my brand all under one umbrella. So I, for all of my little ventures and businesses, I don't have multiple Instagram accounts. So for someone to come to my feed, if they see like photography and then now there's a kitchen remodel, you know what I mean? It, it typically wouldn't work, but I feel like it does because the images and branding is all the same.
Speaker 3:
25:33
What you've done is you've taken so many different elements and you've made them cohesive because of being intentional. Otherwise it would, it would feel incredibly chaotic. But did it has such a perfect flow to it because you were so intentional in the layout of it. Exactly. Awesome. Okay. So I need to ask what platforms are you on and why?
Speaker 2:
25:54
I am on Facebook and Instagram and so specifically those because they have just worked the best for my business as far as sharing things as clients share them. Um, especially for Facebook, it's more about sharing, tagging people. It's seen in more feeds. I do find a lot of value in Facebook still. And then Instagram, I'd love the engagement of it. I love the stories. I love live. Um, there'll be able to go live on there. And so I just find a lot of engagement in Instagram. And then Pinterest is where I find the most affiliate income that I'm making is because linking things in my blog and people finding that from Pinterest. And then lastly, I don't, it's not necessarily a platform, but my own website, my own blog and I think is the most important because two reasons really. One, we're like a few days away, probably from like a new social media thing that's gonna take off and Instagram's nothing. Or every day hundreds of people are in businesses are having their Instagram accounts hacked and taken away. So imagine with 200,000 followers tomorrow morning, you may not, you may have. And so if you haven't built that a your website and a blog about as a hub to to have people where they go or your newsletter or anything like that, you're left with nothing.
Speaker 3:
27:10
So true. You need to have that safety contingency plan in place in the case that any extreme event like that happens or even just an algorithm change to where now you have to man, you're only hitting 10% of your audience if you're lucky. And so there's, there's so many different things we're a home based website is and I've always preached that home based website all the time because you use the mediums and which the vehicles in which you drive that traffic to your website are going to constantly change the effectiveness of them. Some of them that are going to break down, some of them are going to crash into a wall. You need to be able to have that consistent home base to be able to drive people to. So I love that you mentioned that. That's great. Okay, so let's talk about how you block out your content plan. Cause that's a big one for a lot of people. I think so many times if we're not intentional and we don't really have a plan in place, we waste so much time. Thinking about the plan, what things have you put into place? How do you, how does that work for you? That flow?
Speaker 2:
28:14
So I have a physical calendar that I use pen and paper for her cause I'm just, I don't want you to do. And so I have that in the first [inaudible] I love it. So I'm writing, I go through, I do it by month typically. And so I go at the beginning of the month and I'll fill out all my contracted posts. So when I'm working with brands and things like that that I'm contracted to actually post on a specific day. So I fill those out first and then I'll go through and also do like any, if I'm watching a course that month, then what do I need to post, you know, which days of the week and I'll fill all that in. Same with, I don't do a ton of photography sessions anymore, but when I do, I also make sure like if I'm going to share a sneak peek or something like that, those are put in there and then I start putting in the additional just extra kind of content.
Speaker 2:
29:06
Um, and usually that extra content is I'll like pull my followers and see like a question I already wants to know and I'll answer it in a picture or something like that. So I want those other ones because remember with those first two, which was brand collaborations and my own course launches, that's selling, those are going to be [inaudible]. So I want the rest of those to be giving. I want to be a tip giver. I fill those in into the calendar. It's all color coded and then I do also my store. So within those blocks it's also then in my stories what I'm going to be posting in my stories that day. Cause usually not actually never usually just like filling myself on stories what I'm doing that day or which is fine because a lot of people care about other people's lives. And get infested.
Speaker 2:
29:50
But for me that's just not my brain in my account. If I'm on stories, it's because I have something to say and be intentional about it. So it filters down into my stories on that calendar and then also onto Facebook when I'm pushing over to Facebook. And then blog posts are in that calendar as well. So all their, so during that, the summer, yeah, during the summer, like I mentioned, my husband's in off season in the summer. And so that's our only time as a family. So I really take a major break from social media to truly be present in my family's lives. And um, so during not summer, I really do try to post every day. Um, that's what Instagram is wanting you to do. But at the same time I'm not chasing the algorithm. If I don't, if I have a day, I don't post, I don't care.
Speaker 2:
30:41
And usually I'm not out on the weekends. So everyday as in Monday through Friday. Um, cause there is no point of chasing algorithm because the algorithms changing all the time. And so if you're chasing it your, it's just an endless, like if you're never gonna wrap race, race, don't stress about it. I'm not like if I only got, you know, 2% of my followers saw that post, okay well I'm gonna analyze and see how I can try to better that in the next time, but I'm not going to sit and waste time worrying about it because at the end of the day we're on someone else's platform. A lot of people get mad. Instagram we get, they get mad at the algorithm, but at the end of it, like there are business that's someone else's entrepreneurial endeavor. Exactly. So Dang good one too. I'm like man,
Speaker 3:
31:26
that's awesome. Okay, so let's break down hashtags a little bit. Do you use them, when do you use them? Do you find them valuable and why?
Speaker 2:
31:35
I do find them valuable is, especially for the photography side of my business and I guess it really depends on kind of what I'm posting about. I would say for the photography side and for like my, I do a lot of home renovation stuff too and there I do find it beneficial. So my biggest strategy is using the bigger hashtags and then also making sure I'm using the really niche specific hashtags as well. Um, within that post. And I'm always trying to make sure I max out on the 30, um, that I'm allotted to not waste any. Um, but I do find definitely find benefit. I get new eyes on it. Is it a tremendous amount? I know for me it's not, but it really, like I said, depends on what exactly
Speaker 3:
32:18
you have hashtag blocks that you saved so you don't have to, how many different blocks do you have and how are you curating those?
Speaker 2:
32:26
I think there's like 25 and Oh, mine are separated. So member I have multiple levels of my business and different things I'm doing. So for like photography, there'll be like 10 different ones, different groupings there that I can come and grab from. And then based on, so for example, if I'm launching a course, a photography course, then those hashtags are not just going to be Kansas City photographer, Casey photographer. I'm hitting every single big city, Dallas photographer, those kinds of things. And then for my home renovations, I have blocks for that. And then for my other content and everything like that. So I definitely use that and always make sure that I'm not sitting there actually typing and typing. No, that's awesome. Okay. Now let's, and you've already touched a little bit on your stories, but what do you traditionally use your stories for and how often are you going live on stories or is it all pre curated content and you're not live?
Speaker 2:
33:22
It's a mix. A lot of them I'm recording, not the day that I'm actually posting. Um, and I do save them up to post specific days and everything like that because, and here's why. I don't want to wear makeup every day. I don't want to get dressed every day. And I'm so glad to hear that cord, a whole week's worth, I'm going to put on a different shirt. I absolutely do that and I'm not, and here's the thing, I'm not, I want to be real. So it's not a matter of like I have to be dolled up for Instagram cause most of time I'm just wearing Mascara and that's it. But I do want to represent my brand well because I am, I'm not just like to work out, I'm showing them work and so I want to look a little bit more professional, um, while still being real.
Speaker 2:
34:02
But so I definitely will, you know, there's about three days a week I'm actually wearing makeup and so I will record a lot of 'em on those days. Um, and or like I know I have the time my kids are at preschool or something like that, then I'll bulk record stories and post that way based on what I need. Um, very rarely, sometimes, but very rarely am I ever actually recording just on the fly. Cause everything, like I said, is intentional. I'm on, I have a point of why I'm doing it and then I never, I never really post in lifetime. Also, especially if I am in places. And I, that's just a safety thing. I don't want people to know where I am and I never very moment that you're there. I just want people to know that and that's just like I said, for safety reasons.
Speaker 2:
34:47
Awesome. Awesome. Okay. What is the biggest mistake you've made as an entrepreneur? Oh good one. I would say one in the beginning, not saying no for sure and not also those first few years. I mean man, I was 21 when I started my business 22 and so not treating it as a business and I wish, and I think that's a learning thing for everybody out is to learn that, but it's like, man, if I can go back now, have the mindset I do because I was so, I mean I was art major, I was an art school. Like I was just so like I don't need to know business, you know that whole mindset and now I'm so passionate about business. I'm like I could go back and know what I know now and treat it like a business. Where would I be today? I want to say
Speaker 3:
35:38
the biggest mistake is just not being, you know, I'm a, it was more of a mindset. I'm a photographer in, I'm kind of a business owner as opposed to, you know, I'm a business owner and I'm a photographer, I'm x or I'm whatever I am is just knowing you are a business owner first. But I think so many of us do that and I think a lot of it breaks down to our own insecurities where we feel like, oh, I don't have a degree for that. I don't have the credentials for that. I'm not allowed to call myself that yet. And yet when we step back, I'm going, I've done that so many times, cut myself down to size because somebody else in my perceived mind has more credentials to be able to claim that title. And so you're passively saying all this is just some side hobby?
Speaker 3:
36:22
I do. Oh, it's not really that big of a deal. We're constantly playing our efforts down because we don't feel we're worthy of that act, abet accreditation. And I'm the same way. If I could go back, I'd be like, you know what? Yes I am a business owner and here's what I do and here's why I love it and you know what? It feeds my family and it makes me happy and it's all of these things. There is no shame in that. So being able to stand up and take, take credit where credit is due and allow yourself to fully embrace and step into what you're trying to create even in the moments where you don't feel it's big enough. Yes, absolutely. Totally agree. I love it. Awesome. Katie, this has been just fantastic. We've gone over so many great just nuggets of wisdom. I know that that my community is going to be very grateful to your service and coming on and being here with me and I know many of them are going to want to find and see more of you. So where can they do that? I am on Instagram at at Katie Beth Lam, k a t I e and then Beth and then lamb, like the animal. And then my website is blog dot Katie lamb.com. Awesome. Katie, thank you so much. This has been such a great time catching up with you and hearing so many words of wisdom. Thank you so much for having me. I'm just so honored to be here.
Speaker 1:
37:38
[inaudible]
Speaker 2:
37:41
thank you for taking the time to connect with me here on the conquering chaos podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, will you please take a moment to leave a review? It's the fuel to my fire and lets me know that my efforts to enact change and broaden your perspective of what's possible matter. Thank you so much for your support. If you want more content like this, don't forget to subscribe and connect with me on social media at Aaron equally or at Aaron equally. Dot Com. Have a fantastic day. Get out there and congress and chaos.